Study reveals the most eye-catching elements of the house

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The blue dots, from largest to smallest, show the tracking movement of the eyes through the elements of the room that have attracted the most attention.

CARDIFF, Wales, UK – Confused.com, a UK-based financial services comparison platform, has published new research using eye-tracking technology that identifies exact parts of a house and the most eye-catching current decorating trends.

To conduct the study, a sample of 71 people was shown a series of pictures of different rooms in a house. The Confused.com research team tracked the total number of times people looked at different items in a room, as well as the total time that they watched it. The fixing ratings for each part were determined by the total number of views for each element.

Considering the time spent working from home over the past 18 months, it might not come as a surprise that office chairs beat every other item in the house as most viewed, amassing a total of 410 views. .

Kitchen floors are the second most viewed item, with 323 views and maintaining the gaze of visitors for 2,987 milliseconds. The crib in a children’s room came in third place, the throw throws in fourth and the kitchen cupboards in fifth.

Curl-covered furniture is the most eye-catching home decor trend right now, followed closely by rattan furniture and dark kitchen cabinets.

The 10 most important things in a home that people focus on the most

  • Office chairs with a total of 410 views and a view time of 3396 milliseconds.
  • Kitchen floors with 323 views and a display time of 2,987 milliseconds.
  • Cot / cot with 255 views and a viewing time of 2,553 milliseconds.
  • Bed throw with 221 views and a display time of 2440 milliseconds.
  • Kitchen cabinets with 204 views and a display time of 2,183 milliseconds.
  • Bathroom mirror with 177 views and a display time of 1,867 milliseconds.
  • Bathroom sink drawers with 162 views and 1888 millisecond view time.
  • Desktop computer screen with 150 views and 1360 millisecond display time.
  • Children’s library with 137 views and 2169 milliseconds viewing time.
  • Bedroom dresser with 135 views and 1,768 millisecond display time.

Piece-by-piece analysis

In the living room, the soft decoration and the centerpieces of the furniture attracted the most attention. Coffee tables, rugs and decorative cushions drawn in most views.

  • The coffee table had 139 views with a view time of 1,419 milliseconds.
  • The mat had 125 views with a view time of 1,258 milliseconds.
  • The throw pillows had 106 views with a view time of 1707 milliseconds.
  • The stage had 82 frames with a viewing time of 1,155 milliseconds.
  • The fireplace had 68 frames with a view duration of 1,273 milliseconds.
  • The gate has 67 frames with a view time of 841 milliseconds.
  • The TV cabinet had 47 views with a viewing time of 600 milliseconds.
  • The TV had 34 views with a viewing time of 948 milliseconds.
  • The curtains had 34 frames with a view duration of 521 milliseconds.
  • The fireplace had 22 frames with a view duration of 763 milliseconds.
  • The wall art had 12 views with a display duration of 511 milliseconds.

The bedroom throw at the foot of the bed attracted the most views and was watched for the longest period of time. The art, the floor, and the curtains were the things people looked at the least when they looked around the room.

  • The bed throw had 221 views with a view time of 2440 milliseconds.
  • The dresser had 135 views with a display time of 1,768 milliseconds.
  • Windows had 105 views with a display time of 1331 milliseconds.
  • The throw pillows had 82 frames with a view time of 992 milliseconds.
  • The bedspread had 67 frames with a view time of 824 milliseconds.
  • The bedside table had 47 views with a view time of 1,094 milliseconds.
  • The lamp had 30 frames with a view time of 656 milliseconds.
  • Art had 28 views with a view time of 843 milliseconds.
  • The ground had 18 frames with a view time of 730 milliseconds.
  • The curtains had 12 frames with a view duration of 373 milliseconds.

The bed / bed in the child’s bedroom was considered the longest, the bookcase right after.

  • The bed / bed had 255 views with a view time of 2,553 milliseconds.
  • The library had 137 views with a view time of 2169 milliseconds.
  • The mat / floor had 127 frames with a view time of 1431 milliseconds.
  • The nursing chair had 116 views with a view time of 1248 milliseconds.
  • The changing table had 74 views with a view time of 919 milliseconds.
  • Art had 41 views with a view time of 638 milliseconds.
  • The curtains had 22 frames with a viewing time of 680 milliseconds.
  • The illumination had 13 frames with a display duration of 541 milliseconds.

The home office has been a staple in the home for the past 18 months, with the office chair being by far what people watched the longest. And while art was one of the less eye-catching elements in the kitchen, living room, and bedrooms, art wasn’t at the bottom of the list in this room.

  • The office chair had 410 views with a display duration of 3396 milliseconds.
  • The monitor had 150 frames with a display duration of 1360 milliseconds.
  • The shelves had 104 views with a view time of 1064 milliseconds.
  • The art had 45 views with a view time of 579 milliseconds.
  • The mat had 38 views with a view time of 615 milliseconds.
  • The lamp had 35 frames with a display time of 631 milliseconds.
  • The keyboard had 28 views with a display time of 585 milliseconds.
  • The desktop had 20 views with a view time of 472 milliseconds.
  • The plants had 10 views with a display time of 297 milliseconds.

The bathroom, being a room mainly for personal care and the toilet, draws the most attention to its mirrors.

  • The bathroom mirror had 177 views with a view duration of 1,867 milliseconds.
  • The sink drawers had 162 views with a display time of 1888 milliseconds.
  • The sink had 125 views with a display duration of 1507 milliseconds.
  • The toilet has 120 views with a display duration of 1363 milliseconds.
  • The bath had 94 views with a viewing time of 1349 milliseconds.
  • The cabinets had 90 frames with a view time of 1044 milliseconds.
  • The tiles had 73 views with a display time of 907 milliseconds.
  • The shower had 49 views with a view time of 802 milliseconds.
  • Windows had 46 frames with a display time of 890 milliseconds.
  • The plants had 28 views with a view time of 575 milliseconds.
  • The illumination had 11 frames with a display duration of 348 milliseconds.

Kitchen research shows the floor was what people’s eyes were drawn to first, but here’s a breakdown of where eyes tended to go next.

  • The floor had 323 views with a viewing time of 2,987 milliseconds.
  • The cabinets had 204 views with a view duration of 2185 milliseconds.
  • The sink had 48 views with a view time of 911 milliseconds.
  • The counters had 37 views with a viewing time of 683 milliseconds.
  • The windows had 33 frames with a view duration of 629 milliseconds.
  • The decorative shelves had 23 frames with a view time of 736 milliseconds.
  • The oven had 22 frames with a view time of 758 milliseconds.
  • The illumination had 16 frames with a display duration of 668 milliseconds.
  • The pots and pans had 12 views and a display time of 534 milliseconds.
  • Plants / flowers had 10 views with a view time of 688 milliseconds.
  • The art had 10 views with a view time of 322 milliseconds.
  • The extractor fan had nine frames with a viewing time of 441 milliseconds.
  • The utensils had three views with a view time of 412 milliseconds.
  • The cooktop had a view with a view time of 193 milliseconds.

“No two homes are the same,” said Jessica Willock, home insurance expert at Confused.com. “Our decor, style, furniture and lifestyles make our home completely unique, but it’s quite interesting to see which rooms and furnishings catch the attention of the masses.”

To see the full research, visit: https://www.confused.com/home-insurance/what-people-look-at-in-your-home.

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